Creating Fatter Bass with Logic's SubBass plug-in

Occasionally you might want to use a sound in a mix that just lacks some low end punch. In some cases traditional equalization will do the trick and adding a small amount of low end will get the job d  

Occasionally you might want to use a sound in a mix that just lacks some low end punch. In some cases traditional equalization will do the trick and adding a small amount of low end will get the job done but in some circumstances you will need more firepower.

Although it's not something I would plaster across a mix it can be a life saver in certain situations and used with caution it can truly enhance a mix. Let's look into the basics of how it operates.

Step 1 - Loading up the SubBass Plug-in

The SubBass plug-in can be loaded onto any track in exactly the same way as more traditional processors can be. Simply locate the plug-in in Logic's 'Specialized' effects folder and insert into the track you want to treat. Simple.

One thing to note here is that I did say 'insert' and this is pretty crucial. It's highly unlikely you would want to use this in a send/return configuration. So for now stick to using this as an insert, it really was designed to be used in this way.

Step 2 - Setting the Frequencies to be Enhanced

The SubBass plug-in has two frequency bands that it can work across and setting them is pretty straight forward. You can easily dial in the frequency of each band by using the 'centre' control.

Once this is set you can use the ratio and bandwidth controls to decide how intense the effect is and what frequency range it works across. Having these two bands with very accurate controls allow you to cover just about any area of your audio.

These two bands can then be mixed so two separate low frequencies can be enhanced in different ways and then mixed to taste at the end of the process.

Step 3 - Mixing Wet and Dry Versions

Once all your settings are in place you can go ahead and use the wet and dry mix control to get an even better grasp on the end result. It's unlikely that you will want to use a fully processed version of your sound, so using this feature allows you to reintroduce some of your dry audio.

Below you can see the final settings used for a drum loop that needed some extra low end. You can also listen to the audio in question before and after, although it's worth remembering you will need to listen on a full range system. Small speakers just won't pick up the processing.

Audio - Before the SubBass is added:


Audio - And after:

Need more mixing tips? Check out these tutorials!

Mo has been a professional in the music industry for around 15 years. He has released material with the world's leading record labels and also produces music for TV and Film. Mo is also a prolific writer and is a regular contributor to magazines such as Music Tech, Future Music and EQ magazine. There isn't a piece of music software tha... Read More

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